CitiCAP Journal 6
In his 6th and concluding journal of CitiCAP, UIA expert Philip Turner describes the final results and takeaways from the project, which includes the lessons learned from the Personal Carbon Trading (PCT) scheme, the finalisation of the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP) and the cycle highway.

Executive Summary

The CitiCAP project (Citizens’ cap-and-trade co-created) received funding from the EU UIA 2nd Call, Urban Mobility theme (2018-2020). The project concentrates on enabling and promoting sustainable urban mobility in Lahti.

Among other measures, such as an open mobility data platform and Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP), the project has developed a model for personal carbon trading (PCT) scheme on mobility and an application for the citizens that enables real-time tracking and visualization of one’s mobility carbon footprint.

The mobility data platform opens up possibilities for new mobility service development. CitiCAP has also developed a model for designing the bicycle route network, by building a 2,5 km smart bicycle highway that includes the latest technical solutions to offer smooth and direct routes from the residential area to the city centre all year round.

This final journal provides a summary of the main deliverables achieved by the project and how their delivery evolved over their lifetime. Annex A covers this in more detail, in relation to the operational challenges associated with all UIA projects as reported in previous Journals (1 to 6).  It shows the evolution of the project at different implementation stages reported in each Journal and the interconnection of actions and decisions taken in order to achieve the final project outcomes. 

The final section of the report concludes with my four final takeaways and lessons learned from the project.

Lahti Direction - Approval of the SUMP

The Lahti Direction is an open participatory process which sets out the city framework and long-term strategy for the city to ensure a sustainable and healthy life for the citizens.  The Lahti Direction work is done in cycles of four years by the City Council terms. In 2017, Lahti started the process that integrates Master Plan and SUMP, the latter being drafted for the first time through CitiCAP[1].  By linking the long-term strategy for the future development of the urban area, alongside the future development of transport and mobility infrastructure and services, it can greatly influence lifestyle and mobility behaviour. This is because safer streets encourage walking and cycling and convenient access to public transport makes it easier to use. In broadest terms, they encourage dense, more connected cities which enhance sustainable mobility choices (as envisaged by CitiCAP) because the conditions support these modes of transport[2].  

The European Commission has long extolled the benefits of implementing SUMPs and has detailed guidance to support implementing such plans in cities across Europe and in other global regions.  The Commission’s guidance[3] was used as the template for Lahti’s plan towards more sustainable forms of mobility. The final plan - which was approved in January 2021 and follows council terms, in that it enables continuous monitoring of continuous development work and implementation of measures along this political cycle. The objective of the SUMP has been designed to go beyond sustainable mobility but has taken a broader tone, so that it contributes to the achievement of the Lahti Carbon Neutrality Target 2025 and the 2030 mobility mix objectives (more than 50% of all trips will be made using sustainable modes of transport). The main elements of the plan are presented below in figure 1.

 

Figure 1 - List of Lahti’s SUMP Measurers (Lahti SUMP, 2021[4])

The SUMP is centred around four key elements, each containing a number of different actions that will be implemented over the source of the SUMP’s lifespan. Annex B provides further details on the individual measures, period of implementation and desired end results.  It is not possible to report stakeholder feedback on the measures taken as they were only finalised and agreed at the start of the year.  Rather, the purpose of this Journal is to provide the reader with a breakdown of these approved actions, as it addresses the question that CitiCAP sought to solve: what is the future of mobility in Lahti for the years ahead?  Lahti’s new SUMP has the answer.

A Smart Bicycle Highway that has improved cycling conditions in Lahti

The main infrastructure development of the CitiCAP project was the 2.5-kilometer-long bicycle highway from the Lahti Travel Centre to Ajokatu (figure 2). The purpose of the bicycle highway is to enable smooth and safe year-round cycling, with its cycle path clearly separated from other transport modes that simultaneously improves walking conditions, notably by employing smart technologies. When reaching Ajokatu, the cycle path connects with another new bike path from Renkomäki to Uudenmaankatu Street and now forms part of a cycling network plan within the city’s master planning work, consisting of about 40 km of main routes and district routes.  In total, around €1.6 million euros was earmarked for this section of the UIA CitiCAP project with citizens heavily involved in the planning of the route through workshops.  The innovative element of the project lies in the fact that the bike path has experimented with various smart solutions.  The project has also used recycled and / or recyclable materials in the construction of the highway as much as possible, thereby helping to advance circular economy efforts of the city.

The bike path received a lot of local attention during its early consultation phase which also encouraged the city to test a range of smart solutions that citizens felt would add value to cyclists, such as information screens, smart bicycle racks and smart lightning, and the route has been diligently paved with social media columns, for example.  About 7% of the total bike path budget was spent on smart features.

Figure 2 - CitiCAP Apilakatu-Matkakeskus smart bike route

Other innovative features that have been installed include sensors that provide real time information on public transport data to enable seamless interconnected journeys along with ‘encouraging’ personalised messages on information tables.  Other new solutions include energy-efficient adaptive LED lighting which reacts to movement and dim and brighten as needed and according to the users. Road signs are also projected on the street, for their part, can be seen in the dark, rain and blizzards.

Displays are still being installed on the bicycle highway, which will be used to indicate the number of users of the path and, for example, weather information.  Sophisticated winter maintenance will also help to keep the cycle lanes accessible throughout the year. A technique based on snow brushes has been piloted in Lahti in previous years, and a total of 20 kilometres of cycle lanes are due to be brushed this winter.  Importantly, the new CitiCAP network will give the city a testing platform that will allow the trialling of new techniques and smart solutions for years to come, and the city is already preparing for these kinds of experiments by installing the necessary infrastructure and cabling for future initiatives.

Thanks to this project, Lahti now has a lot of potential for becoming a thriving cycling city and through better infrastructure - as provided by the CitiCAP bicycle highway - it can help to lay the foundation for a positive reform of the cycling network and changes in behaviour for years to come.

Lessons Learned from CitiCAP’s PCT Pilot

Prior to CitiCAP, PCT has been a relatively untried policy, especially in the transport sector (see CitiCAP Zoom-In 1 for further information[1]).   In its purest form, individuals are allocated an allowance of carbon from within an overall national or local cap on the quantity of carbon emissions produced by individuals within the jurisdiction. People surrender their credits as they make certain purchases that result in emissions. Those who need or want to emit more than their allowance have to ‘buy’ allowances from those who can emit less than their allowance.  Alternatively, those who emit less can be rewarded for doing so. The market effect encourages people to pursue energy efficiency and to reduce their carbon emissions. Over time, the overall emissions cap (and therefore individual allocations) can be reduced in line with international, national or local targets. As a result, the price of carbon allowances becomes more expensive encouraging people to reduce their emissions. 

Thanks to the CitiCAP project, Lahti has become the first city in the world to launch a PCT to reduce emissions from transport.  Lahti’s approach differs slightly to that described above in that it is primarily an incentive system that encourages users to reduce their mobility emissions via 1) financial incentives through CO2 pricing; 2) providing information on users’ emission and their reduction possibilities; and 3) proving an online marketplace to reward citizens[2].   The model adopted in Lahti is simpler in that it does not utilise a market mechanism that would enable participants to trade emissions between themselves.  As such, Lahti’s PCT model is a voluntary-based one that emphasizes incentives over penalties.

The pilot and research part of the project started in June 2020 until the end of 2020.  The initial goal was to have around 1,300 users in the pilot, which equates to around 1% of the population of Lahti.  In the end, approximately 2,500 were registered in the application, which exceeded the original target. In addition, approximately 150 users participated in a reference group where mobility was recorded but who did not take part in PCT. Based on the data and analysis done to date, it has shown that the PCT system has worked as planned: user specific emission allowances were allocated based on initial background questionnaires, participants’ mobility modes and distances were automatically recognized, and information on mobility emissions was provided almost in real time.

The number of active users of the CitiCAP application during the PCT pilot varied weekly from 100 to 350.  The average recorded number of trip distances, by mode, during the pilot phase (24 February 2020 - 24 December 2020) shows that car travel was the dominant mode of transport (circa. 80-90% mode share), especially for longer distances.  Between the end of July to end December 2020, emissions fell by around 40% (see figure 3) but it is not clear whether the PCT scheme alone was responsible for this, even though 36% of users stated that their mobility choices became more sustainable due to the use of the application.  What is more likely, is the impact of Covid-19 lockdown restrictions when they came into force over this period.  Data shows that the mobility of Lahti residents decreased by up to half and the use of public transport decreased by up to 80% as people stayed in to remote work and school. 

Figure 3 - Emissions level of PCT participants and allowance price changes during the Autumn of 2020 (source: CitiCAP[3])

When looking at emissions over this period, the allowance prices reached a peak of just over €0.75per kg of CO2.  This price high saw a gradual reduction in emissions but not a marked reduction as hoped.  People surveyed did not really register this price rise (only 37% of participants did) and as a consequence, it had very little impact on user’s average weekly emissions.  It can be taken from this that the economic incentive of the scheme was not great enough alone to influence behaviour (only around 175 vouchers were redeemed during the test and pilot phases).  Rather, the desire to change has perhaps a stronger influence in terms of reducing an individual's mobility habits than a CO2 price but that the PCT scheme was an important mechanism to engage people to enact this willingness to change.  What the results do show for certain is that it is possible to implement a voluntary PCT scheme using ICT technology. 

Conclusions & Final Takeaways

My interest in the Lahti project, notably the PCT part of it, stems from my time working at the UK Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) in 2008 where we assessed the feasibility of implementing such a scheme.  The conclusion was that it was a policy idea that was 'ahead of its time' due to high implementation costs and public resistance to the concept[1] but I have always wondered whether it would be taken up as a policy option in the future.  This in part explains why I was so excited by and enjoyed working on CitiCAP. 

These past few years have had their obvious challenges, but the city should be rightly proud of what it has achieved.  Coming to the end of this journey, I would like to share with you my four final conclusions and takeaways as the UIA Expert for the CitiCAP Project.

1. CitiCAP has the potential to be scaled up in Lahti and beyond

CitiCAP got a lot of positive attention, both EU - and internationally. It was awarded the Gitex 2019 Smart City series (biggest technology exhibition in the Middle East) and its global climate action plan was rewarded with the 2021 EU Green Capital Award.  I think that the interest in CitiCAP lies in the fact that it presents a new policy approach to dealing with emissions from a sector that is difficult to abate but one that has received strong, long term citizen support.  

There is clear interest in other cities to build on the Lahti experience, so it is important that the lessons learned from CitiCAP are shared widely.  For me, the most endearing insight from the project is how the trips or days out accrued through the PCT’s marketplace leads to experiences and happy memories with friends or families for individuals.  It’s a policy approach that personalises in a positive way (unlike, say, a parking fine) and that enables people to reflect on their lives as a whole and consider future generations.  Rarely does a government policy do that, which I feel is the real game changer and as a consequence, has the potential to be scaled up both regionally and globally.

2. CitiCAP has demonstrated that PCT is a viable policy option to influence positive behaviours

I reported in Journal 5 that during the test phase of the scheme, around 60% of users easily understood the purpose of the PCT and around half found the PCT as an interesting policy development.  The final results reflected in this Journal show that the scheme is an effective and engaging way to encourage people to register and reduce transport emissions.  Given the willingness of citizens to participate and to continue with the project, it shows that there is no barrier to local Governments developing and deploying policies that will prepare the ground for personal carbon trading in the future. 

3. CitiCAP has not just engaged it citizens, it co-created a future with them

Active participation of stakeholders was always essential to the success of the project so that citizens understood their role and place to help foster a culture of co-creation in all its city policies.  Co-creation is a powerful concept: engaging broad stakeholders in a design or problem-solving process as co-designers.  In fact, participatory design was born in the region and as such, it is fitting that co-creation features so prominently in the CitiCAP project - especially as the UIA is all about testing new and unproven solutions to addressing urban challenges.  The project has shown that all stakeholders (and this also means that the citizen and city does not exist alone) have an important voice, which has been best reflected in shaping the Master Plan / SUMP process, so that they get to understand each other's perspectives, possibilities and constraints.  In doing so, it has created joint ownership of CitiCAP and its outputs, which marks a crucial point in the city's transition to cleaner and better urban transport in the future.

4. While Covid has had a major impact on our daily lives it could help encourage the uptake of sustainable transport going ahead

We all know that Covid has impacted our daily lives, meaning that we were either travelling less or walking and cycling more.  I would argue, this makes CitiCAP and its main deliverables a more attractive policy option for decision makers in that it helps lay the foundations for positive changes to transport behaviours that may result in permanent habitual changes.  Research has shown that disruptions can be a catalyst towards this shift but avoiding negative consequences, this requires governments to take decisive actions sooner rather than later.  With Covid, many cities have rediscovered the benefits of cycling and walking and CitiCAP can help to reinforce this trend in behaviour, as it had laid the necessary infrastructure and long-term planning for this to happen.  This can be the lasting legacy of CitiCAP.


[1] UK Government Environmental Audit Committee (2008): https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmenvaud/565/565.pdf

 

Challenge

Challenge Level

 

 Observations

Journal 1

Journal 2

Journal 3

Journal 4

Journal 5

Journal 6

1.Leadership for implementation

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

At the very beginning of the project, local elections were held which saw the appointment of a new political leadership team. With renewed vigour and commitment for CitiCAP, this helped ensure strong leadership for implementation from the start, which helped to weather the storm created by the Covid crisis.

This short-term commitment has translated to a commitment to long term implementation, with clear lines of accountability and transparency which has ensured that the project has been delivered on time and to budget.

2.Public procurement

Low

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

As a European project, the challenges around public procurement were always considered to be low as the appropriate funds were always earmarked for implementation.  As such, previous Journals have always taken this into account, hence why the challenge has nearly always been regarded as being low. The only question was how to scale up the project beyond Lahti once the CitiCAP project has been delivered, as UIA funding was not made available for this purpose.  As a result, in Journal 3, the risk was classified as medium because it was not clear at the time how the technology platforms used to support the Lahti PCT as it could not be used in other cities as it would need to be adapted to fit different, local circumstances. This assessment was undertaken just before the commencement of the pilot project, so it was also not certain that the PCT platform developed would allow for this to happen. However, following the successful pilot launch, the risk quickly returned back to low, as local businesses were quick to sign up to the scheme, which subsequently helped build the business case for the project in other areas.

3.Integrated cross-departmental working

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Given the range of different city departments involved in integrating the SUMP into the established city master planning process for the first time, cross departmental working and integration was always going to be a challenge.  As a result, this challenge was rated as medium in most Journals, but it was clear that as leadership for implementation grew, this helped the city to work across department silos.  Based on personal experience, maintaining cross departmental is a constant challenge and for this reason, the challenge was regarded as being medium until the final stage of the project.  In fact, it emerged as being one of the real successes to emerge from CitiCAP.  

4.Adopting a participative approach

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

The principle of co-creation was always at the heart of the CitiCAP project: from the development of the SUMP and Master Planning process, the cycle highway scheme and for ensuring that the PCT policy and approach was fit for purpose.  This co-creation element could only be achieved by  adopting a participative approach for the get-go so that holistic solutions could be found that truly benefited citizens.  As such, the challenge has always been regarded as being low as it has been embedded throughout the project lifecycle and high levels of stakeholder participation has been registered across all elements of project activities from the very start.

5. Monitoring and evaluation

High

High

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Journal 1 and 2 highlighted the significant challenge to generate, monitor and process a wide range of data sources: from the integrated accounting of carbon emissions, monitoring mobility habits, personal data protection issues, accessibility and SUMP implementation. 

Until this data started to flow into the project, the challenge remained high but when it started to, the challenge was downgraded to medium.  This is partially thanks to the strong participative approach mentioned above but also through pilot testing and stakeholder feedback through the online marketplace associated with the PCT.  With more (real time) data, the city was able to make better, informed decisions, which eventually saw the challenge reduced to low. 

One unforeseen benefit of integrating real time travel data into the PCT scheme, was the ability of the city to monitor and evaluate the impact the Covid crisis had on mobility behaviours and the effectiveness of mitigation measures.  In the long-term, this can help the city better plan resilience efforts.

6. Financial sustainability

High

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

As an EU project, CitiCAPs financial sustainability (as with public procurement) was never really in question.  The only major challenge was how the PCT was going to evolve beyond Lahti.  Journals therefore only focused on this aspect of the project when assessing this challenge.

This was initially regarded as being high as Lahti was the first global city to attempt to use a PCT scheme for transport. As such, there was no guarantee that the project would be a success.  Another reason was that the PCT did not have a climate market mechanism behind it, meaning that no carbon trading would occur.  While this was never the intention of the scheme, it did remove a possibility to establish a long-term business case for the scheme.  This is perhaps a second stage after CitiCAP as the first, was to demonstrate that a PCT scheme is a viable policy option so that a market mechanism can be used in tandem in the future.

As more businesses joined the PCT marketplace and interest in the scheme grew beyond the city, the challenge was downgraded to medium.  Now that the final results of the PCT have shown that it is possible to implement a voluntary scheme using ICT technology, the future financial sustainability is considered low because it has shown that a potential business case exists for scaling up, especially if coupled alongside a carbon market in the future.

7. Communicating with target beneficiaries

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

This has always been a strength of the project - as with adopting a participative approach with stakeholders - so the challenge has been classified as low throughout the project’s lifetime.  With constant and open communications in each stage of the project, the city has ensured that citizens have always been engaged and encouraged to participate in the formulation of policies and solutions.  Citizens have reacted positively to this and have been further enhanced through the EU Green Capital process and events. 

This openness in communication has ensured a high level of accountability at all levels in Lahti but this openness  has sometimes delayed elements of the project (e.g., the finalisation of the cycle highway routes).

8. Upscaling

Medium

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

As mentioned above, the challenge for Lahti around upscaling the PCT was that a transport PCT has never been implemented before.  So, it required a lot of active communication with other cities so that they could understand how the new policy approach could work. Zoom-In 1 highlighted the many policy challenges associated with a PCT so the challenge for upscaling was initially regarded as medium but as more results started to emerge from the testing phase and more cities started to hear about the scheme - partly thanks to the spotlight given to the project/Lahti through the EU Green Capital - the challenge was downgraded to low, at around the time of Journal 3. 

It remains to be seen whether other cities will follow the exact model by Lahti, but thanks to the wide media attention and dissemination of results, it has helped to raise awareness of the scheme to a much wider audience.  

Sustainably growing Lahti

1. Target network for cycling

2030: Modal share of cycling 16% (trips/day)

Time Period: 2019 - 2030

The aim is to enable smooth and fast bicycle traffic and low-carbon mobility in the city, and increase the safety of cycling between different residential, service and travel-to-work areas.  Walking conditions are also improved at the same time by separating cycling from walking. The proposed measures include updating the routes of the target network for cycling, preparing an investment plan, updating the planning guidelines for bicycle traffic, as well as general planning and implementation of the target network.   The main routes will be implemented step by step as part of the municipal infrastructure investment plan.  In addition, bicycle parking will be promoted in key locations as part of the works.

1.1. First aid kit for main cycling routes

Time Period: 2020 - 2022

Implement light and rapid first aid measures on the main routes of the target network for cycling in order to improve cycling conditions. Such measures include targeting the smoothness of cycling infrastructure, including resurfacing as well as removing curbstones and replacing them with pavement. Particular attention will be paid to the safety and improvement of intersection areas.

1.2 Guidance for the target network for cycling

Time Period: 2020 - 2030

Define guidance principles to plan road markings, traffic control equipment, and signage for the target network for cycling so as to improve smooth navigation to various destinations. The measure also includes the planning and implementation of signposts as well as harmonizing the guidance of the bicycle traffic infrastructure on main cycling routes.

2. Improvements on winter maintenance

Time Period: 2019 - 2025

Establish clear winter maintenance practices and update the maintenance categories to promote winter cycling. New requirements will be added for the winter maintenance of main bicycle routes when the re-tendering maintenance contract commences.  The quality of the maintenance of main bicycle routes will also be increased by lowering the permitted upper limit for snow accumulation. Salt brushing will be introduced on some routes and will also apply to pedestrian and bicycle paths. Anti-skid treatment will also be carried out chemically on routes that are salt brushed.  Attention will be paid to the maintenance of pedestrian paths on key routes.

3. Schools’ own sustainable mobility plans

2021: 50% of schools have prepared a plan

Time Period: 2019 - 2030

Measures will be defined with the pupils and teachers at each school to promote sustainable urban mobility. The school commute plans will be updated, and the implementation of the measures will be monitored using the results of a school commute survey conducted every four years.

4. Sustainable mobility plan for city personnel

2030: Share of sustainable modes of transport in commuting increased (from 47% in 2018)

Time Period: 2019 - 2030

Commuting of city personnel will be directed towards more sustainable modes of transport by, for example, regulating parking facilities, investing in the quality of social premises, providing bicycle parking, offering employer-subsidized commuter tickets, and the establishment of an occupational wellbeing award.  In addition, the possibilities of making the city’s official cars available as shared-use vehicles outside office hours, first to personnel and later to city residents, will be considered.

5. Communication campaign for sustainable mobility

Time Period: Continuous

Various channels will be used to engage the possibilities of sustainable mobility, raising awareness about the climate impact of mobility, awards and encouraging sustainable mobility by means of, for example, the furthering of the CitiCAP PCT application. Events implemented together with stakeholders will be organized annually during themed weeks, such as the National Cycling Week or the European Mobility Week.  Local businesses will also encourage their employees towards more sustainable mobility.  Additional actions include participating in national sustainable mobility networks and sharing lessons learned and good practices.

6. Bicycle point

Opened in 2021

Time Period: 2019 - 2022

Increase the attractiveness of cycling by implementing a low-threshold bicycle point in the Lahti city centre area, where cyclists can get help with bicycle maintenance or independently maintain their bicycles. In addition, bicycle maintenance and cycling courses can be arranged at the bicycle point.

Lahti Services

7. Public transport trunk route network

Time Period: 2018 - 2022

Speed up public transport travel times, improve the accessibility of the fringe areas of the city centre, and provide a better level of service in areas with large numbers of potential public transport users.

7.1 Development of public transport passenger information

100% of shared vehicles generating real time data

Time Period: 2020 - 2022

Real-time schedule information to be presented, for example, in the route planner, on the timetable displays of stops, and on the passenger compartment displays of buses. Monitoring data can also be used to plan schedules. Passenger compartment displays can also be used to present interchanges as well as enabling the introduction of a traffic light priority systems, making public transport smoother and more punctual.

8. Transition of public transport to alternative fuels

70 buses using alternative fuels

Time Period: 2020 - 2030

Alternative fuels include electricity, hydrogen, biogas, and biodiesel in operating contracts awarded between 2021 and 2025 - 41% of buses must be low-emission. At least half of these must be electric. In addition to electric buses, the other half may use gas or renewable fuels. In contracts awarded in 2026 – 2030, the corresponding share is 59%. In urban transport starting in the summer of 2020, the fuel must be at least second-generation biodiesel. Electric or biogas vehicles will earn additional points in tendering contracts.

9. Development of park-and-ride

2030: Planned park-and-ride facilities implemented: 4 for cars; 8 for bicycles

Time Period: 2019 - 2030

Plan and increase park-and-ride parking spaces or areas in the trunk route network area of Lahti and sub-regions. The development of park-and-ride at the Travel Centre is one of the city’s key objectives. In the future, the aim is to increase the number of park-and-ride parking spaces at the Travel Centre and to improve the safety of storing bicycles. In addition, the measure will be used to develop park-and-ride for bicycle and car traffic at other public transport hubs or at the end points of trunk routes.

10. Traffic and mobility data

Time Period: 2020 - 2030

Developing the collection of mobility and traffic data to be more systematic and making better use of data in traffic planning and control, developing the skills of city employees as well as creating conditions for the development of new mobility services by compiling and opening private and public transport information interfaces, or by providing reports on the mobility data collected. The aim is to make better use of traffic and mobility data (e.g., collected by CitiCAP) to support decision-making and planning work. Cooperation on this topic will be continued with universities and companies in the area, for example, in the form of cooperation projects.

11. City bike system

Utilisation rate of city bikes 2022: 4–6 trips/bike/day

Time Period: as of 2019

Promote sustainable mobility through the planning and implementation of a city bike system so as to complement the provision of public transport services. The measure includes preparing the procurement of the city bike system on the basis of the feasibility study, the implementation of the procurement and the implementation of the system so that it will start operations in 2021.

Lahti City Centre

12. Traffic arrangements in the city centre

Time Period: Continuous

The measures will be implemented as part of the Lahti City Centre Traffic and Mobility Plan 2030 (LIISU2030).

12.1 Centralisation of parking in the city centre

Time Period: 2019 - 2030

The accessibility of car parking facilities will be improved by better connecting them to the street network and smart guidance will be provided. The city’s parking policy has recently been updated and in the case of future parking facilities in the city centre, investigation work will be carried out as part of this measure.

12.2 City centre circulation plan

Time Period: 2019 - 2030

Traffic calming in the area to create an environment that favours pedestrians, bicycle traffic and public transport using appropriate street space, parking and traffic control measures. The planning will include, for example, child and health impact assessments, business and company impact assessments, as well as noise and emissions modelling. Stakeholders will be involved as the planning progresses. The necessary investigations and feasibility studies are to be carried out during the first phase of the planning work. The second phase will involve preparing more detailed street-specific plans and the implementation schedule.

12.3 Increasing pedestrian-oriented design on the streets of the city centre

Time Period: 2019 - 2030

This measure includes increasing the comfort of walking on city centre streets, for example, by clearly separating walking and cycling from each other. The measure also involves updating the plans of streets within the main streets surrounding the city centre and further looking into measures to create a comfortable and safe walking environment in the city centre area.

Living for Lahti

13. Implementation of the road safety plan

2025 vision zero

Time Period: as of 2019

A wide-ranging and comprehensive action plan has been drawn up to support road safety and education work, with both concrete means of traffic education and communication as well as those aimed at increasing the safety of the traffic environment.

About this resource

Author
Philip Turner, UIA Expert
Project
Location
Lahti, Finland Small and medium-sized cities (50k > 250k)
About UIA
Urban Innovative Actions
Programme/Initiative
2014-2020

The Urban Innovative Actions (UIA) is a European Union initiative that provided funding to urban areas across Europe to test new and unproven solutions to urban challenges. The initiative had a total ERDF budget of €372 million for 2014-2020.

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